Undergraduate Courses

Click here for a current list of courses - Choose from SLA (Slavic), PLS (Polish), BCS (Bosian Serbian Croatian), CZE (Czech) and RUS (Russian).
 
BCS 101 Beginning Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian I Fall An introduction to the Bosnian-Croation-Serbian (also called Serbo-Croatian) language that develops the four major language skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Class time is devoted to mastering conversational skills, grammar explanations, oral drills, and reading a variety of texts--popular writing, fiction, poetry, and expository prose. Covers the fundamentals of BCS grammar (verbal conjugations, aspect, the primary verbal tenses, and all cases); high-frequency vocabulary will be progressively learned and reinforced. Five classes. No credit is given for BCS 101 unless followed by BCS 102 M. Beissinger
BCS 102 Beginning Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian II Spring A continuation of BCS 101. This course continues to develop and refine the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing), concentrating on conversational practice, advanced grammar points, oral drilling, increased reading (BCS literature, folklore, and expository prose, including works chosen according to students' interests), and viewing films. Prerequisite: BCS 101. Five classes. M. Beissinger
CZE 101 Beginning Czech I Fall Introductory course designed to teach the basic aspects of Czech grammar, vocabulary, and communication in a variety of situations. The course aims to teach all four language skills: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. Five classes. No credit is given for CZE 101 unless followed by CZE 102. Staff
CZE 102 Beginning Czech II Spring A continuation CZE 101. This course continues to develop and refine the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing), teaching all fundamental aspects of Czech grammar and basic communication skills in a variety of situations. As the course progresses, the rich Central European culture of Bohemia and Moravia will be sampled through poetry, film, and fictional as well as expository prose. Prerequisite: CZE 101. Five classes. Staff
CZE 105 Intermediate Czech I Fall Advanced grammar topics, building of vocabulary through studying Czech word formation and reading challenging samples of Czech literature (prose, poetry, drama). Continuing practice in oral communication. Prerequisite: CZE 102 or instructor's permission. Three classes supplemented by required discussion sections, tutorials, and language lab. Staff
CZE 107 Intermediate Czech II Not offered this year Advanced grammar topics, building of vocabulary through the study of Czech word formation and reading challenging samples of Czech literature. Continuing practice in oral communication. Prerequisite: CZE 105. Three classes supplemented by required discussion sections, tutorials, and language lab. M. Pettus
PLS 101 Beginning Polish I Not offered this year A beginner's course that introduces the student to four areas of competence in Polish: speaking, grammatical knowledge, listening and reading comprehension, and writing. Emphasizes active language targeted at concrete practical contexts and communicative situations. Previous knowledge of other Slavic languages is advantageous, but not mandatory. Classes combine lectures, recitation, and drill formats. Five classes. No credit is given for PLS 101 unless followed by PLS 102. M. Pettus
PLS 102 Beginning Polish II Not offered this year A continuation of PLS 101. This course continues to develop and refine the four language skills (speaking, grammatical knowledge, listening and reading comprehension, and writing). Emphasize active language targeted at concrete practical contexts and communicative situations. Classes combine lectures, recitation, and drill formats. Prerequisite: PLS 101. Five classes. M. Pettus
RUS 101 Beginner's Russian I Fall Introduction to the essentials of Russian grammar. Presentation of grammar reinforced by oral practice of grammatical patterns. One hour per week devoted specifically to development of oral skills. Five classes, one one-hour laboratory. No credit is given for RUS 101 unless followed by RUS 102. M. Pettus
RUS 102 Beginner's Russian II Spring A continuation of 101. Introduction to the essentials of Russian grammar. Presentation of grammar reinforced by oral practice of grammatical patterns. One hour per week devoted specifically to development of oral skills. Five classes, one one-hour laboratory. M. Pettus
RUS 105 Intermediate Russian I Fall Grammar review; advanced grammar; introduction to word formation; expansion of vocabulary through readings of classical and modern fiction and history. One hour per week of translation and discussion of readings. Prerequisite: successful completion of 102 or placement test at Princeton. Five classes, one one-hour laboratory. M. Pettus
RUS 107 Intermediate Russian II Spring A continuation of 105. Grammar review; advanced grammar; introduction to word formation; expansion of vocabulary through readings of classical and modern fiction and history. One hour per week of translation and discussion of readings. Prerequisite: 105. Five classes, one one-hour laboratory. M. Pettus
RUS 207 Advanced Russian Reading and Conversation I Fall Selected texts (19th- and 20th-century poetry and prose, contemporary journalistic prose) with discussion and analysis in Russian. Four classes. S. Korshunova
RUS 208 Advanced Russian Reading and Conversation II Spring A continuation of 207. Selected texts (19th- and 20th-century poetry and prose, contemporary journalistic prose) with discussion and analysis in Russian. Four classes. S. Korshunova
RUS 405 Advanced Russian Grammar through Reading A practical approach to advanced Russian grammar and structure through reading and translation of Russian prose texts with special focus on difficult grammatical constructions. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: 207 or 208. Staff
RUS 406 Russian Sentence Structure through Reading A basic introduction to Russian sentence structure with special emphasis on word order, use of participles and gerunds, impersonal sentences, negation, voice, and long/short form adjectives. The course includes substantive readings of Russian texts and their syntactic analysis. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: 207 or 208. Staff
RUS 407 Advanced Russian through Film Fall LA RUS 407 is an advanced Russian language course based on classic Russian films. The object of this course is to improve students' command of Russian (both spoken and written) and to introduce students to some masterpieces of Russian cinema, which serve as a window on Russian culture (both art and history). Since this course emphasizes critical analysis, it is accessible only to students who have already achieved a high level of linguistic sophistication (three years of Russian language or the equivalent). K. Blank
RUS 408 Advanced Russian through History and Culture The course aims to improve students' proficiency in idiomatic Russian by using materials on historical and cultural topics. The materials cover Russian history from the days of Kievan Rus' to the post-Soviet era. Weekly reading and compositions. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. K. Blank
SLA 219 Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky: Introduction to the Great Russian Novel (also
RES 219
Fall LA A survey in English of Russian literature up to 1860. The course concentrates on master prose writers of the first half of the 19th century: Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, the early Dostoevsky, and the early Tolstoy. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Knowledge of Russian not required. M. Wachtel
SLA 220 The Great Russian Novel and Beyond: Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Others (also
RES 220
Spring LA A survey in English of Russian literature from mid-19th century to Soviet literature. Authors read include, among others, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Nabokov, and Bely. Two lectures, one preceptorial. Knowledge of Russian not required. E. Chances
SLA 221 Soviet Culture, Above and Below Ground (also
RES 221
Spring LA A survey in English of Soviet literature from 1917 to 1965 against the background of major social and political developments. Readings include works by Zamyatin, Babel, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, and other representative authors. Two lectures and preceptorial. Knowledge of Russian not required. K. Reischl
SLA 311 Russian Music (See MUS 339)
SLA 312 Russian Drama (also
RES 312
 LA Introduction to major dramatic works of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Pushkin, Gogol, Chekhov, Shvarts, and Vampilov. Readings, discussions, oral and written reports in Russian. Two 90-minute seminars. Prerequisite: RUS 207 or instructor's permission. O. Hasty
SLA 316 Ethical Dimensions of Contemporary Russian Cinema (also
RES 316
VIS 353
Not offered this year EM Exploration of the quest for moral values in Soviet and post-Soviet Russian cinema of the 1960s to the present. Topics include, among others, the effects of Stalinism; the struggle for freedom of individual conscience under totalitarianism; the artist's moral dilemmas in Soviet and post-Soviet society; materialism versus spirituality. Films of Andrei Tarkovsky, Nikita Mikhalkov, and others. One three-hour seminar. Knowledge of Russian not required. Staff
SLA 410 Bakhtin, the Russian Formalists, and Cultural Semiotics (See COM 410)
SLA 411 Selected Topics in Russian Literature and Culture (also
RES 411
 LA Topics include: Russian literature and the city; Russian literature and the intellectual; the search for moral value in post-Communist literature; satire; Russian literature and music; 20th-century Russian poetry, Russian emigre literature. M. Wachtel
SLA 412 Selected Topics in Russian Literature and Culture LA Topics include: Russian literature and the city; Russian literature and the intellectual; the search for moral value in post-Communist literature; satire; Russian literature and music; 20th-century Russian poetry, Russian emigré literature. O. Hasty
SLA 413 Pushkin and His Time (also
RES 413
 LA An introduction to Pushkin's works with attention to a number of genres (lyric, long poem, drama, short story). Readings in Russian with discussions in Russian or English, depending on students' preference. Two 90-minute classes. Prerequisite: RUS 207 or instructor's permission. M. Wachtel
SLA 415 Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace: Writing as Fighting (also
COM 415
RES 415
Not offered this year EM The course is primarily about War and Peace, framed by some earlier and later fiction and by Tolstoy's essays on art and religion. Tolstoy's radical ideas on narrative have a counterpart in his radical ideas on history, causation, and the formation of a moral self. Together, these concepts offer an alternative to "The Russian Idea," associated with Dostoevsky and marked by mysticism, apocalypse, and the crisis moment. To refute this idea, Tolstoy redefined the tasks of novelistic prose. Seminar. C. Emerson
SLA 416 Dostoevsky (also
RES 416
LA A consideration of Dostoevsky's major works with particular emphasis upon their relation to the political, social, religious, and literary currents of his time. Knowledge of Russian not required. One three-hour seminar. E. Chances