Academic Program

Intermediate Russian in St. Petersburg

The Princeton in St. Petersburg Program (P-i-P) gives Princeton undergraduates the opportunity to take Princeton’s complete second-year Russian course (Intermediate Russian) in eight weeks over the summer.

Course Times 

Typically, students are in class from 9:10 AM to 11:00 AM and 11:30 PM to 1:20PM Monday through Friday, with a coffee break in between. In keeping with the intensive nature of the program, the classes are supplemented by homework. However, the workload is not all-consuming; students still find time to take advantage of St. Petersburg’s rich cultural life.  

Career Preparation

The Program has had unmatched success in preparing students for advanced work in Russian. In addition, the city has led many P-i-P students to return in subsequent summers for further study. 

Academic Program

The academic program consists of three parts: Grammar, Conversation and Reading. These courses are typically 4 or 8 hours per week and are taught by Princeton's Slavic faculty and instructors from the Derzhavin Institute.

Grammar

RUS 105R (June) 

  • Grammar is taught jointly by Prof. Pettus and an instructor from the Derzhavin Institute.
  • 8 hours per week 

RUS 107R (July)

  • Grammar is taught by Derzhavin instructors.
  • 8 hours per week

Conversation

RUS 105R and 107R

  • Both couses are taught by Derzhavin instructors.
  • 8 hours per week

Reading

RUS 105R (June) 

  • Reading and analysis of Russian short stories and poems.
  • Taught by Derzhavin instructors.
  • 4 hours per week 

RUS 107R (July) 

  • Dostoevsky module taught by Prof. Blank.
  • 4 hours per week

There are some urban novels where the city itself becomes a major character—and Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment is one. By this point in the course, students read selections from Crime and Punishment in Russian (having already read the entire novel in English). They “make the acquaintance” of their hero through tours, buildings, streets and canals, many of which have not changed significantly since Dostoevsky’s time.