Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2017

BCS 102 Beginning Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian II A continuation of BCS 101. This course continues to develop and refine the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing), concentrating on conversational practice, advanced grammar points, oral drilling, increased reading (BCS literature, folklore, and expository prose, including works chosen according to students' interests), and viewing films. Instructor(s): Margaret Hiebert Beissinger
Section(s):
C01 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM M T W Th
COM 236/SLA 236/HLS 236/ANT 383 Traditions, Tales, and Tunes: Slavic and East European Folklore This course explores oral traditions and oral literary genres (in English translation) of the Slavic and East European world, both past and present, including traditions that draw from the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish East European communities. Topics include traditional rituals (life-cycle and seasonal) and folklore associated with them, sung and spoken oral traditional narrative: poetry (epic and ballad) and prose (folktale and legend), and contemporary forms of traditional and popular culture. Discussion and analysis will focus on the role and meaning of Slavic and East European oral traditions as forms of expressive culture. Instructor(s): Margaret Hiebert Beissinger
Section(s):
L01 01:30 PM - 02:50 PM T Th
CZE 102 Beginning Czech II This course builds on the introductory course CZE101 and is designed to teach the basics of Czech grammar, vocabulary, and communication in a variety of situations. The course focuses on all four language skills: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. It introduces the rich Central European traditions as they manifest in Czech culture, visual art, film, music and literature. Instructor(s): Mark Russell Pettus
Section(s):
C01 08:00 AM - 08:50 AM M T W Th F
PLS 107 Intermediate Polish The class will continue to improve students' knowledge of Polish through conversation and review of grammar, and it will enhance their reading skills through the analysis and translation of some Polish poetry and fragments of prose. There will be also short written assignments. Instructor(s): Mark Russell Pettus
Section(s):
C01 09:00 AM - 09:50 AM T W Th
RUS 102 Beginner's Russian II The objective of RUS 102 is to give a basic knowledge of Russian: basic training in speaking, reading, writing, and comprehending the Russian language in a cultural context. Instructor(s): Mark Russell Pettus
Section(s):
C01 09:00 AM - 09:50 AM M T W Th F
C02 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM M T W Th F
C03 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM M T W Th F
RUS 107 Intermediate Russian II Major emphasis on the development of vocabulary and oral expression with continued presentation and review of grammar. Vocabulary thematically organized to include such topics as travel, city life, nature, hobbies, politics, etc. Training of all language skills in a cultural context. Vocabulary reinforced through reading of cultural texts. Instructor(s): Mark Russell Pettus
Section(s):
C01 12:30 PM - 01:20 PM M T W Th F
RUS 108 Russian for Heritage Speakers II In this class heritage students will continue developing advanced skills in Russian (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) as well as exploring aspects of Russian culture and history. Materials will include Russian animated cartoons, films, and texts drawn from classic and contemporary Russian literature. Instructor(s): Svetlana Korshunova
Section(s):
C01 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM M T W Th F
RUS 208 Advanced Russian Reading and Conversation II Reading and discussions of poems by Alexander Blok, Osip Mandelshtam, Anna Akhmatova, and Joseph Brodsky; review of selected grammar topics; work with the movie; discussions of life in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. Instructor(s): Ksana Blank
Section(s):
C01 12:30 PM - 01:20 PM M T W Th
SLA 220/RES 220 The Great Russian Novel and Beyond: Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and Others An examination of significant trends in Russian literature from the 2nd half of the 19th century to the Russian Revolution and a bit beyond. The course focuses on many masterpieces of 19th & 20th-century Russian literature. The works (mostly novels) are considered from a stylistic point of view and in the context of Russian historical and cultural developments. The course also focuses on questions of values and on the eternal "big questions" of life that are raised in the literature. Authors read include Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Bely, Nabokov, and Kharms. Instructor(s): Ellen Bell Chances
Section(s):
L01 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM M W
P01 02:30 PM - 03:20 PM W
P02 03:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
P03 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM Th
P99 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM
SLA 221/RES 221 Soviet Culture, Above and Below Ground This interdisciplinary survey explores Soviet literature, art, theater, and film after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. We will explore the works of avant-garde authors and artists, official writers and painters, authors who wrote "for the desk drawer", and those whose creative works were circulated in the underground. In our analysis of Soviet artistic production, we will focus on major cultural topics in and around the increasing pressure of shifting political landscapes, ideology, propaganda, the publishing market, and the role of the writer in Russian society. Instructor(s): Katherine M.H. Reischl
Section(s):
L01 03:00 PM - 04:20 PM T Th
SLA 366/RES 347/ECS 356 Eastern Europe: Culture and History The course will discuss the main trends in East European history and culture, concentrating mostly on 20th and 21st centuries. Each week will be devoted to one aspect of East European studies and the classes will combine theme-plus-methodology approach. There will be several invited speakers. The course is part of the track in East European Cultures and Societies (EECS), one of the two tracks for Certificate in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies. Instructor(s): Irena Grudzinska Gross
Section(s):
C01 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM M W
SLA 367/RES 367 On Space in Russian Culture This seminar takes into account space in its manifold definitions: from the city as text, with a rhythm and a syntax of its own, to alternative, non-conventional geometries, and their aesthetics; from space/time to the outer space and its claiming; from desired or imagined spaces to the contours of the text; from architecture and the environment to global positioning systems and the digital humanities. By looking at literary and theoretical texts produced in the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries, we will track the poetics of space and the epistemological consequences of its literary expression. Instructor(s): Elena Fratto
Section(s):
S01 03:00 PM - 04:20 PM M W
SLA 368/HUM 368/RES 368 Literature and Medicine This course will examine themes that are paramount in our lives as individuals, communities, and societies' illness and healing, caregiving, epidemics, the distinction between normal and pathological. Our reflections on ethics will feature stories and storytelling as an entry point. Why do doctors and patients need stories? How does storytelling illuminate medicine as a system of representation? What rhetorical devices are embedded in the way we conceive of sickness, well-being, and the medical institutions? We will address these questions and will explore the overlaps between medicine and storytelling within texts from all over the world. Instructor(s): Elena Fratto
Section(s):
L01 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM M W
P01 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM W
P02 03:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
P03 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM Th
P04 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM W
P05 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM W
P06 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM Th
P99 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM
SLA 413/RES 413 Pushkin and His Time The course is envisioned as both a language and literature course. Readings and discussion will be in Russian. We will sample writings in many genres (lyric and narrative poetry, short prose, drama). Instructor(s): Ksana Blank
Section(s):
C01 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM T Th
SLA 420/ANT 420/COM 424/RES 420 Communist Modernity: The Politics and Culture of Soviet Utopia Communism is long gone but its legacy continues to reverberate. And not only because of Cuba, China or North Korea. Inspired by utopian ideas of equality and universal brotherhood, communism was originally conceived as an ideological, socio-political, economic and cultural alternative to capitalism's crises. The attempt to build a new utopian world was costly and brutal: equality was quickly transformed into uniformity; brotherhood evolved into the Big Brother. The course provides an in-depth review of these contradictions between utopian motivations and oppressive practices in the Soviet Union. Instructor(s): Serguei Alex. Oushakine
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
SLA 90 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian No Description Available Instructor(s): Margaret Hiebert Beissinger
Section(s):
S01 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM