Graduate Courses

Spring 2017

HIS 508/SLA 508 Holocaust of European Jews: Witnessing in Literature and Personal Documents Representation of the Holocaust is recognized as a deeply problematic challenge. We will examine issues of representation and investigate how the experience is reflected in personal documents and works of fiction. Instructor(s): Irena Grudzinska Gross, Jan T. Gross
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
RUS 550 Russian for Academic Purposes II In this course, graduate students continue developing skills required to perform in a Russian-speaking academic context across core subject areas of literary analysis and cultural studies. Students are expected to discuss and assess the results of their research and present papers in their field of study at a "mock" conference in Russian. The course includes a comprehensive review of Russian grammar and syntax as well as academic genres and styles. Instructor(s): Svetlana Korshunova
Section(s):
C01 12:00 PM - 01:30 PM T Th
SLA 518 Major Russian Poets and Poetic Movements: Post-Symbolist Poets This seminar is devoted to major writings of Russian poets during the post-Symbolist period up to the Stalinist era. Close readings of selected poetry and prose of Acmeists Akhmatova and Mandel'shtam, Cubo-Futurists Mayakovsky and Khlebnikov, and the unaligned Tsvetaeva and Pasternak serve as points of departure to discuss hallmarks of Russian modernism and issues relating to emigration, art and politics, gender, and the negotiation of novelty and tradition. The art of self-presentation and the act of reading - how they both shape and are shaped by the texts and their authors - is considered over the course of the entire semester. Instructor(s): Olga Peters Hasty
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
SLA 529/COM 528 Seminar on Andrei Bitov Analysis of works of 1 of Russia's most important contemporary writers. Focus on major novels, including "Pushkin House," the 1st Russian postmodernist novel. We explore his wide-ranging concerns, such as psychology; philosophy; science; other arts (including jazz & cinema); people's relationship to other biological species; integrity & societal and psychological obstacles to it. We examine him as a Petersburg writer. Focus also on his relationship to time, history, & other writers; his place in Russian & Soviet literature & culture. Instructor(s): Ellen Bell Chances
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
SLA 531 Topics in Russian Literature or Literary Theory: Haunted House:Russian Literature In the Age of Realism The first part of the class deals with a general survey and description (physiology) of Russian realism as a cultural movement. In the second part, we focus on Russian Realists' ideological struggle against Romantic values and an unpredicted result of this struggle -- "spectralization" of social and political realities they claimed to mirror in their works and creation of the image of Russia as a house haunted by numerous apparitions: ghosts of the past and guests from the future, tormented women and suffering children, afflicted peasants and demonic nihilists, secret societies and religious sects. Instructor(s): Ilya Vinitsky
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
SLA 599 Slavic Dissertation Colloquium A practical course intended to facilitate the dissertation writing process. The seminar meets every week for 2 hours, or less often depending on the need and pace of the participants. Dissertation writers circulate work in progress for feedback and meet for discussion as a group. The seminar is required of all post-generals students in Russian literature who are in residence. Instructor(s): Ilya Vinitsky
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM F
SLA 750 Socialism and Utopia No description available Instructor(s): Serguei Alex. Oushakine
Section(s):
S01 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM